Seal Facts

Common Seal

Scientific name:

Phoca Vitulina

(Also referred to as ‘Harbour seals’ in other parts of the world).

Common seals, also known as harbour seals, are charismatic marine mammals found along coastlines worldwide. With distinctive
V-shaped nostrils and spotted coats, they play vital roles in marine ecosystems despite facing population declines in recent years.

Subtract

Quick Facts:


Common seals generally start having their pups in the summer months of June and July however, we sometimes see early pups in May and then stragglers in August and September.

At birth, grey seal pups are small, measuring 2 to 3 feet (65-100cm) in length and weighing between 6 to 12 kilograms

Grey seal pups are born with a waterproof coat, shedding their lanugo fur in utero. They quickly recover after birth and swim with their mothers.

They are weaned between 4 – 6 weeks of age, and have been known to stay with their mothers for weeks afterward to learn how to hunt and other survival skills.

The name ‘Common’ comes from this species having the most wide-ranging populations, with an estimated 350,000 – 500,000 animals world-wide.

Adult males reach up to 6.5 feet (1.9metres) in length and weigh up to 150kg. Males have a shorter life span of up to 25 years.

Adult females are slightly smaller reaching 5.5 feet (1.7metres) in length and up to 100kg. Females have a longer life span of up to
35 years.

Common seals in Ireland are protected under the Irish Wildlife Act, 1976, and the EU’s Marine Mammal Protection Act, 1972, as their population dwindles to around 3,000 to 4,000.

The name ‘Common’ comes from this species having the most wide-ranging populations, with an estimated 350,000 – 500,000 animals world-wide.

Add text

Add text

Add text

Image

Seal Conservation

Protection of Seals

It is against the law to intentionally disturb or harm a seal. Both Grey and Common Seals are aProtected Species in Ireland Under the Irish Wildlife Act, 1976 and The EU’sMarine Mammal Protection Act, 1972. They are considered a species of special concern in Ireland due to the important part they play in our marine environment.

Sign up for Monthly Pup-dates filled with wholesome and enriching content about the seal pups we have rescued and rehabilitated.

Subscribe to our newsletter below

COMING SOON
Back to Top